Flip Flop Flying

Nine eleven

with 8 comments

So, it’s 9/11 today. At least it is in these parts of the world that use the numerical date in a logical way. Never did understand how the people who decide these things in the US thought it’d be good to have the date read month/day/year. How does that make sense? Surely the date should read in increasingly sized sections of time. Shouldn’t it? Do other countries use the month/day/year style? Hmmm…
Aaaaanyway, 9 November is also the birthday of Lou Ferrigno and more importantly, it was the day in 1989 when whoever was living in my flat, and all other East Berliners, could go over to West Berlin for the first time since the Wall went up; which is my way of saying the second On This Day thing for de Volkskrant/oog is online.
Dutch version English version

Written by Craig

November 9th, 2005 at 10:11 am

Posted in Uncategorized

8 Responses to 'Nine eleven'

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  1. do you know, as i got on the bus to bradford forster square this morning, i looked at my watch and it said 11 9. but for some odd reason i read it backward and thought to myself ‘it’s nine eleven’.

    Bushra

    9 Nov 05 at 11:04 am

  2. Oooh, I can be the first to get all computery and pedantic.

    If you want to describe the date, it goes like this:

    2005 11 09

    Cos if you start with 4 digits, it’s obviously a year. And if you start with the year, obviously the next one is the month.

    You can extend it to include time, very precisely:

    2005 11 09 11:59:00.000

    And if you schmoosh it all together, you get a number. You can thus sort in date order by sorting in numerical order:

    20051109
    20051110
    20051111

    The only problem is that, for human, you’re putting the least interesting bit of information (i.e. what year it is) first. So, date-wise, it would perhaps make sense to reverse it:

    09 11 2005

    So, in conclusion: yup, the Americans are doing it wrong.

    pauldwaite

    9 Nov 05 at 1:01 pm

  3. ISO standard is for YYYYMMDD, instinctivelly we do it DDMMYYYY, and the US gets all funky and does it MYDYMWTF. Home of the free, you know.

    Oog is cool, j’aime very much.

    ed

    9 Nov 05 at 2:37 pm

  4. I blame it on the same people here that refuse to convert to the metric system.

    At our work we use day month year because the REST OF THE FRIGGIN WORLD does.

    In other words, some of us know better.

    b

    9 Nov 05 at 3:23 pm

  5. If the newly revamped Guardian had any sense they’d sign you up immediately for a regular On This Day feature. They’re really wonderful, Craig, very clever and a very unusual way of revitalising such a familiar theme. Huge congratulations.

    Ian Mac

    9 Nov 05 at 6:34 pm

  6. Thanks Paul and Ed for your geeky knowledge.
    Becki, happy birthday.
    Ian, You’re a nice man. thank you.
    Bushra, don’t wanna leave you out, so hello to you and your bus.

    Craig

    9 Nov 05 at 7:06 pm

  7. I very much like the “on this day” thing.

    I like it so much, if fact, that if I were a book publisher, I would ask you to create an entire year, so that I could read through it whenever I sit on the toilet to do my business which is usually daily looking forward to bowling derick.

    Anonymous

    9 Nov 05 at 8:40 pm

  8. Thanks, but you’re two days early on the birthday!

    b

    10 Nov 05 at 4:43 pm

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