Flip Flop Flying

Archive for the ‘Sports’ Category

Diamond luchadores

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Written by Craig

September 9th, 2013 at 12:14 pm

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Mexican diamonds

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Written by Craig

September 6th, 2013 at 8:43 am

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Scottish diamonds

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See also yesterday’s pixelly diamond-shaped football kits of English teams.

Written by Craig

September 4th, 2013 at 8:21 am

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Diamond animated Arsenal kits

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That last drawing of all the teams… well, here’s one team’s home kit, away kit, and the goalkeeper versions of both of those: animated.

Written by Craig

September 3rd, 2013 at 2:13 pm

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Diamonds

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Written by Craig

September 3rd, 2013 at 10:02 am

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Three new sporty infographics

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Written by Craig

September 2nd, 2013 at 1:55 pm

Andy Murray

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I drew this while I was watching him win Wimbledon.

http://flipflopflyin.com/andymurray/index.html

Written by Craig

July 20th, 2013 at 5:06 pm

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Maradona vs. Belgium

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As iconic as this photograph is, I have no idea who took it. (Update: the photo was taken by Steve Powell. Thanks to Keith Last for telling me this.) Type “Maradona Belgium” into Google Images and many of the results are of this image. Type in simply “Maradona” and it comes up fairly quickly, too.

What the photograph shows us is six Belgian players all watching what Diego Maradona is doing. (The game was Belgium and Argentina’s first group game at the 1982 World Cup in Spain, at the Camp Nou in Barcelona.) What we take from the photograph is further confirmation of what we already know: Maradona was utterly fantastic. And that is what the photograph is intended to do.

But there’s a lot that the photograph does not tell us. Aside from not telling us that Belgium won the game 1-0 (Erwin Vandenbergh, 62′), the photograph is a little bit deceiving.

On YouTube, there are two videos of highlights from the game. (1st half, 2nd half.) The moment in the photograph is about one minute and fifteen seconds into the second video.

Maradona is fouled, and the referee awards Argentina a free kick, and gives a yellow card to Luc Millecamps.

Osvaldo Ardiles takes a short free kick, passing it to Maradona.

And this is where we see the moment that the photograph was taken. Maradona had not even touched the ball at this point. His left foot is raised ready to receive the ball.

We can see in the video Ardiles is about to run directly through the Belgian players who made up the wall. And all of those players who, in the photograph, look like they are there to stop Maradona being awesome, are actually just breaking out of being a wall, eyes following the ball. Maradona attempts to cross the ball to a teammate on the left side of the box, but it’s cleared by Millecamps.

The photograph… well, it tricks us.

Nonetheless, it’s a cool photo, and it illustrates a point beautifully: Maradona was fucking amazing.

Written by Craig

May 30th, 2013 at 8:07 am

Posted in Blah blah,Sports

World Cup squads

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Another soccer chart today. This time, I’m re-visiting and updating something I did (badly) in 2008, when I looked at the Brazil and Argentina World Cup squads over the years, and where the players played their club football. Unsurprisingly, players went where the money is, and more and more played in Europe. So, yes, I’ve updated those, and to contrast that, added charts looking at (West) Germany and Italy, too.

http://flipflopflyin.com/flipflopflyball/other-squads.html

Written by Craig

May 28th, 2013 at 8:43 am

Posted in Infographics,Sports

A couple of football infographics

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The last week or so, I’ve been thinking that it’s probably time to do more non-baseball infographics. And not just other sports, too. But for now, it is sport-themed. Football. Soccer.

Both are regarding English football, but at different ends of things. First, a look at Liverpool FC’s last 23 seasons. 23 championship-less seasons.

And the other chart looks at those teams that have been relegated from the Football League to “non-league football.” The first team to experience automatic relegation was my hometown team, Lincoln City, back in 1987. And plenty of other teams have suffered the same fate since.

http://flipflopflyin.com/flipflopflyball/other-lfc9113.html
http://flipflopflyin.com/flipflopflyball/other-relegation.html

Written by Craig

May 27th, 2013 at 7:36 pm

Posted in Infographics,Sports

“My Story”

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There are a lot of sports autobiographies called “My Story.” I did a search on Amazon.co.uk…

Written by Craig

January 25th, 2013 at 12:32 pm

Posted in Silly,Sports

10th anniversary

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If I were really committed, I’d get this made up into a sleeve patch, like on sports uniforms, and have this sewn onto all of my clothes for the year. But I’m not, so for now, it’s just gonna be an image on my little part of the Internet.

Written by Craig

January 1st, 2013 at 11:59 am

Posted in Artwork,Silly,Sports

Aficionados

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Three elements of a bigger picture about Mexico City that I’m working on. These are fans of the city’s three soccer teams: Cruz Azul, Pumas, and Club América.

Written by Craig

December 20th, 2012 at 1:41 pm

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Top flight ice lollies

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Written by Craig

August 20th, 2012 at 1:23 pm

Wrestlers

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Written by Craig

June 21st, 2012 at 8:51 am

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Rooney

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Written by Craig

June 19th, 2012 at 2:11 pm

Posted in Artwork,Sports

Five Things I Could Do with a Certain Degree of Confidence Were I to Be Named in Tonight’s Yankees Line-up

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Five Things I Could Do with a Certain Degree of Confidence Were I to Be Named in Tonight’s Yankees Line-up

Swing my bat standing in the on-deck circle

Tap the catcher’s shin guards with my bat

Have my ass patted by the first base coach

Chat with the first baseman

Argue with the umpire

Five Things I Absolutely Could Not Do with a Certain Degree of Confidence Were I to Be Named in Tonight’s Yankees Line-up

Hit the ball

Field the ball

Steal a base

Not have a beard

Spit sunflower seed shells without them dribbling down my chin

Written by Craig

June 6th, 2012 at 3:22 pm

Posted in Blah blah,Sports

Lionel

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Via The Classical, this nice wee compilation of Lionel Messi being knocked around, having his shirt tugged, and being hacked down… and getting back up and playing football.

Written by Craig

March 30th, 2012 at 7:49 am

Posted in Sports,Video

“It’s not the same game, is it?”

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Every 8.11 days of this year, I attended a sports event. An ice hockey game, a day at the races, and a night of lucha libre, three football games, and 39 baseball games. On Boxing Day, I went to the last of those sporting events, the Blue Square Bet Premier League game between Lincoln City and Grimsby Town at Sincil Bank. The league is, to me, still called the Conference. It’s the fifth tier of English football. What used to be called (and probably still is) “non-League football,” meaning it’s not part of the Football League. It’s all quite confusing; all you need to know is it’s four whole divisions below Liverpool, Arsenal, etc.

Lincoln City were the first professional football team I watched regularly. In the late eighties, in my late teens, with a job in a supermarket, I had a few spare quid to go now and again to watch them. They had slipped out of the fourth tier the year before, and I watched them play in the Conference and go straight back up. Lincoln City have never really been that good. For all of my life, they’ve never been higher than the third tier, and most of the time, they’ve been in the fourth tier. But, on the last day of the 2010/11 season, they lost and were relegated.

Grimsby Town, their opponents on Boxing Day, were relegated to the fifth tier the season before. Grimsby, for those of you unfamiliar with the geography of the United Kingdom, is also in Lincolnshire. Prior to the Grimsby game, the highest attendance for a Lincoln City home game this season was 2, 448 (on the first home game of the season). There were 5,506 there for the Boxing Day local derby, around 1,700 of which had travelled the 37 miles from the north Lincolnshire coast to the, ahem, big city.

A ticket in the Lincolnshire Echo Stand, along one of the sides of the pitch, costs £18 at the turnstiles (EUR 21.58, USD 28.21, CAD 28.75, MXN 395.31). You can see a Toronto Blue Jays game and have enough money for a beer for the same price. It wasn’t too cold; a bit nippy. Windy, though, so I got a cup of tea from the little place selling snacks and drinks. The milk was already in the tea when it came out of the big urn. Players from both teams warmed up on the pitch. Running little drills. The PA played a few pop songs, stuff that I assume is in the charts. Closer to kick off time, the PA played The Jam’s “A Town Called Malice,” and “All or Nothing” by the Small Faces, who, Wikipedia tells me, played at Sincil Bank in 1966 with the Who and the Kinks.

Closer to kick off, the music ramped up a bit. First, with the Dam Busters March, the theme tune of the film about the World War II operation where No. 617 Squadron set off from RAF Scampton, a few miles outside of Lincoln, on a mission to bust the shit out of dams in the Ruhr valley with bouncing bombs. That was followed by Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries. And then we were ready for football!

Being a local derby, there was a fair bit of back and forth chanting between the fans of both teams. Both sets of fans taking turns to shout “Who are ya?” at each other, and minutes later shouting “You’re the shit of Lincolnshire” at each other. That seemed odd, considering they’d both been asking who they were.

On the field, it got off to a frustrating start. Not much space on the pitch. Well, actually, there was a ton of space on the pitch, but like pre-teen children, all the players seemed to be following the ball around. It was all too crowded for anyone to do anything. If any player showed any element of skill, it seemed inadvertent. A nice touch here, a yard of pace, a pass into space: all let down by the team-mates who hadn’t seen what might happen.

Throw-ins and goal kicks would see the teams assume their formations in small areas of the field. Every outfield player is in about a sixth of the field for the free kick that the goal keeper is taking in the photo below. It was depressing to watch. This wasn’t football. And if this style were to somehow sweep the globe so that Barcelona and AC Milan were playing like this, I’d stop watching football all together.

(More depressing than the style of play, though, was hearing someone behind me refer to Lincoln City’s black French midfielder Jean-Francois Christophe as being “just like a gorilla.”)

One good thing, though, was that the ball they played with was like the black-and-white panelled ball you automatically think of when you close your eyes and think of what a football looks like (that is, like this Adidas Telstar ball). I can understand that changing the way a soccer ball looks might be a good boost for sales of balls for Adidas or Nike or whoever, but it seems like a bad idea. A baseball is a baseball, and pretty much looks like it always has. Basketballs, American football balls, tennis balls, hockey pucks: they don’t change every few years. Why should soccer balls change so often?

After ten minutes or so, Lincoln City began to take control of the game. They had more possession, and it was quite often in Grimsby’s half of the field, and just after half an hour, Conal Platt put Lincoln ahead. Lots more chanting from the Lincoln fans:

“We are Imps! We are Imps!” (That’s Lincoln City’s nickname.)
“Sit down, shut up! Sit down, shut up!” (Directed at Grimsby fans.)
“Stand up if you love Lincoln, stand up if you love Lincoln.” (I stayed in my seat.)
And my favourite, the profound, humorous, and subtle “We hate Grimsby and we hate Grimsby, we hate Grimsby and we hate Grimsby, we hate Grimsby and we hate Grimsby, we are the Grimsby haters!”

Lincoln were good for the lead; had a couple more chances too, but, half time score: Lincoln City 1 Grimsby Town 0. I spent the break watching the clouds and some pug-faced Lothario who was chatting up a woman while her companion was away buying tea. I listening to people talk, listening to the Lincoln accent, the half-time analysis, and the post-Christmas chit-chat. The smell of Pukka pies and burgers, instant soups and halitosis. An air raid siren sounds, and the Dam Busters March fires up again. Grimsby Town kick off, Player A touches it to player B, as is customary. Player B passes it a few yards back to player C. Player C hoofs it as hard as he can into the far corner, and his team mates all set up in the defensive formation I’d spent 45 minutes watching before the break. Clearly the Grimsby Town manager must be an NFL fan, cos he certainly doesn’t seem to be a fan of soccer.

On and on. No real skill. The wind picked up and so did Grimsby. Lincoln, who were looking good for a win at half time were doing nothing in the second half. It was all Grimsby, and after just seven minutes, Scott Garner equalised. The visiting fans celebrated. Because the visiting fans’ area of the ground was small, they were compact and loud. They sang that they were the pride of Lincolnshire. They taunted City fans: you’re not singing any more. That was quickly followed up with a take on the old standard chant, “you only sing when you’re winning,” instead re-fashioned to reflect the town’s maritime industry: we only sing when we’re fishing.

The old man sat behind me said to his companion, “It’s not the same game, is it?” He was referring to Grimsby’s utter dominance early on in the second half, but conceptually, he’s right. It’s not the same game at this level. This is, and it bears repeating, not football. Grimsby scored a second goal nine minutes later. And from then on, the City fans were pretty quiet. The Grimsby fans were loud. They sang the team’s nickname in three elongated syllables: Ma-rin-ers. I had forgotten that that was their nickname. And my mind drifted for a while, as my eyes followed the ball on (and quite often, in the air above) the field, my mind drifted to thinking about the Seattle Mariners. That leaping mind trick where a tiny thought chain links other things, places, and events, and I was thinking about my time in Bellingham, Washington. But it didn’t last long: there was a fairly cavalier challenge by a Town player on the edge of the penalty box. Players were in a huddle, pushing each other around, and when a player from either team was subsequently shown yellow cards, the home fans questioned the integrity of the referee. The resulting free kick was at least on target. But the keeper saved it.

It did seem, though, that it had sparked a bit of something in City. With less than ten minutes to go, they looked like they were trying a little. The Grimsby fans, though, were gearing up for victory. All on their feet, singing “Grimsby ’til I die” (a horrendous thought, frankly), and “Mariners black and white army.” The latter chant was sung pretty much solidly over and over and over again for the last seven or eight minutes of the game. It was probably the most impressive thing that I got for my £18.

The final whistle blew up. Imps 1 Mariners 2. I walked into town, overhearing amateur Alan Hansens and Mark Lawrensons dissect the game. Because of the local rivalry, there were a fair amount of policemen gathered along the High Street, especially outside the pubs nearest the ground. But I just trudged home, kind of shocked that the style of football was so bad. It makes me wonder if it was that bad back in the 1987/88 season when I went to a lot of games. I don’t remember it being that bad, but that’s just a biased memory: I don’t want to remember it being that bad because, on the whole, I used to enjoying going to Sincil Bank.

Maybe one day, though, I’ll somehow become a multi-billionaire and I’ll want some sort of sporty plaything, and I can buy Lincoln City, build a fancy new stadium, invest in expensive players and watch them rise swiftly through the divisions, and then one day, they’ll challenge for the Premier League title, and everyone else will hate Lincoln City for being a tacky nouveau riche club; but I will sit there in a fancy coat, with fancy friends, and I will watch Lincoln City beat Manchester United 5-0, as I happily wolf down a Pukka pie.

Written by Craig

December 28th, 2011 at 6:21 am

Posted in Blah blah,Sports

Too much infographicking

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Written by Craig

August 7th, 2011 at 4:26 pm